ALL-ON-4 Dental Implants with photos

Posts for: November, 2021

November 22, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: LANAP  

Dr. Max Arocha, Dr. Karla Jaquez, Dr. Eitan Gross, and Dr. Miguelina Arocha can provide LANAP in Plantation, FL, to help with various health issues. But exactly is this treatment, and who is a good fit for it? Here's what you need to know about this unique care option.

What is This Treatment?

This acronym stands for Laser-Assisted New Attachment Procedure and is a laser treatment used to handle periodontitis and other types of disease. It helps to contour your gums and remove gum tissue, particularly diseased or infected tissue that could cause other health issues in your mouth. 

Often, people with advanced periodontal diseases, like gingivitis, may need this therapy to remove damaged gum tissue and keep their mouth healthier. In addition, it provides an alternative to traditional surgical procedures, allowing you to avoid scalpels or knives during your treatment.

Good Candidates for This Procedure 

Most people should respond well to this type of laser surgery. It can help with many kinds of oral health conditions, particularly periodontal disease, and will help ensure that you don't experience any long-term concerns. Just a few groups who make good candidates for this process include:

  • People with very soft or sensitive gum tissue
  • Those with a bleeding disorder that may occur during routine surgery 
  • Anyone with periodontal or gum disease 
  • Individuals with dental fear or a fear of surgery 
  • People with heart conditions that may not react well to traditional surgery 

These individuals often respond well to LANAP in Plantation, FL, and can recover from decay and other dental concerns with minimal difficulty. It is crucial to reach out to a dentist who may understand this care option and who can provide it for your needs as a person.

Don't Neglect Our Help 

If you need dental care help, don't hesitate to call Dr. Arocha, Dr. Jaquez, Dr. Gross, and Dr. Arocha to get treatment. They can provide LANAP in Plantation, FL, to meet all of your needs. Then, call (954) 432-7771 right away to learn more and get the help necessary to manage this problem quickly and efficiently.


HeresWhatToDofor4KindsofDentalInjuries

Although kids are resilient, they're not indestructible. They're prone to their share of injuries, both major and minor—including dental injuries.

It's common for physically active children to suffer injuries to their mouth, teeth and gums. With a little know-how, however, you can reduce their suffering and minimize any consequences to their long-term oral health.

Here are 4 types of dental injuries, and what to do if they occur.

Chipped tooth. Trauma or simply biting down on something hard can result in part of the tooth breaking off, while the rest of it remains intact. If this happens, try to retrieve and save the chipped pieces—a dentist may be able to re-bond them to the tooth. Even if you can't collect the chipped pieces, you should still see your dentist for a full examination of the tooth for any underlying injury.

Cracked tooth. A child can experience intense pain or an inability to bite or close their teeth normally if a tooth is cracked (fractured), First, call the dentist to see if you need to come in immediately or wait a day. You can also give the child something appropriate to their age for pain and to help them sleep if you're advised to wait overnight.

Displaced tooth. If a child's tooth appears loose, out of place or pushed deeper into the jaw after an accident, you should definitely see a dentist as soon as possible—all of these indicate a serious dental injury. If they're unavailable or it's after hours, your dentist may tell you to visit an emergency room for initial treatment.

Knocked-out tooth. Minutes count when a tooth is knocked completely out. Quickly locate the tooth and, holding it only by the crown and not the root, rinse off any debris with clean water. Place it in a glass of milk or attempt to place it back into the socket. If you attempt to place it back into the socket, it will require pressure to seat the tooth into position. You should then see a dentist or ER immediately.

A dental injury can be stressful for both you and your child. But following these common-sense guidelines can help you keep your wits and ensure your child gets the care they need.

If you would like more information on pediatric dental treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


TheresMoreWeCanDoAboutToothDecayBesidesDrillandFill

Until recently, the standard treatment for tooth decay remained essentially the same for nearly a century: Remove any decayed structure, then prepare and fill the cavity. But that singular protocol has begun to change recently.

Although "drilling and filling" saves teeth, it doesn't fully address the causes of decay. In response, dentists have broadened their approach to the disease—the focus now is on an individual patient's particular set of risk factors for decay and how to reduce those.

At the heart of this new approach is a better understanding of oral bacteria, the true cause of decay. Bacteria produce acid, which can erode tooth enamel and create a gateway into the tooth for decay to advance. We therefore want to lower those risk factors that may lead to bacterial growth and elevated acidity.

One of our major objectives in this newer approach is to reduce plaque, a thin film of food particles used by bacteria for food and habitation. Removing plaque, principally through better oral hygiene, in turn reduces decay-causing bacteria.

Plaque isn't the only mechanism for bacterial growth and acidity. Appliances like dentures or retainers accumulate bacteria if not regularly cleaned. Reduced saliva flow, often due to certain medications or smoking, limits this fluid's ability to buffer acid and acid reflux or acidic beverages like sodas, sports or energy drinks can disrupt the mouth's normal pH and increase the risk for enamel erosion.

Our aim, then, is to develop a long-term strategy based on the patient's individual set of oral disease risk factors. To determine those, we'll need to examine their medical history (including family), current health status and lifestyle habits. From there, we can create a specific plan targeting the identified risk factors for decay.

Some of the elements of such a strategy might include:

  • Daily brushing and flossing, along with regular dental cleanings;
  • Fluoride dental products or treatments to strengthen enamel;
  • Changes in diet and excess snacking, and ceasing from any tobacco use;
  • Cleaning and maintaining appliances, as well as monitoring past dental work.

Improving the mouth environment by limiting the presence of oral bacteria and acid can reduce the occurrence of tooth decay and the extent of treatment that might be needed. It's a more nuanced approach that can improve dental health.

If you would like more information on tooth decay prevention and treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Decay: How to Assess Your Risk.”




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